Common Questions From Accident Victims in Tennessee

The victims of serious injuries and accidents are often left with a lot of questions. In our FAQ, you can get the answers to some of the most common questions our Nashville injury attorneys hear, as well as important information about your rights and legal options if you’ve been hurt in Tennessee.  

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  • Can I get in trouble for lying on interrogatories?

    In the initial stages of a lawsuit, attorneys in the case will send interrogatories to the opposing party to get more information on the relevant issues. Interrogatories are simply a series of written questions used to understand the details of the case. However, each party responding to interrogatories must sign a statement to swear that his or her responses are true—and failure to tell the truth can have serious consequences.

    The Dangers of Lying on Interrogatories

    The most damaging thing that can happen if someone lies on interrogatories is that they can be punished by the judge at trial. When the truth is discovered, the judge may impose a fine, assign additional litigation costs, or dismiss the case entirely if it was brought by the party who provided false information. If the party lies repeatedly or has been deliberately dishonest about material facts in the case, the judge may initiate a perjury charge.

    Even if a party escapes punishment for lying on an interrogatory, the untruth can still hurt the party if it is discovered during trial. Any amount of misinformation has the potential to bring the party’s character and actions into question, and attorneys are well-trained to spot any discrepancies or potential falsehoods during depositions.

    The amount of harm a lie can do to a case will depend on the circumstances, such as:

    • Whether the untruth was intentional. People may give a false response by mistake, such as when he or she is tired or simply filled in the wrong line on a form.
    • What the untruth was about. False information about a relatively minor factor in the case may not have as much of an impact as a lie about a crucial point.
    • Whether there were multiple untruths. If an attorney detects one lie, he or she may scrutinize everything you say in an attempt to uncover further dishonesty.
    • How the party reacted when confronted with the untruth. Attorneys will typically ask the same question multiple times, giving the responder several attempts to correct misinformation.

    Even if you know the importance of always telling the truth in your injury case, you cannot control how the opposing party in your case will answer questions on his or her interrogatories. If you suspect that the person you are suing has made false statements, you should share your suspicions with your lawyer so that he or she can investigate the claim and provide evidence of the truth in court.

    For more information on your rights after an accident, fill out the short contact form on this page or request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.

  • Should I hire a lawyer back home or in the state where I was injured?

    When you are injured on vacation in Tennessee, you might be tempted to return home before seeking the advice of an attorney. You may be waiting because you are not sure how serious the effects of the injury are, have used a particular an attorney in your home state in the past, or simply want to enjoy what little is left of your trip. However, one of the best things you can do to protect your injury case is see an attorney before leaving the state.

    Jurisdiction Laws Can Affect Your Vacation Accident Claim

    Most courts require injury cases to be filed in the state where the accident occurred. Known as jurisdiction, these laws dictate where the case will be heard and who will have the ability to argue the claim. Each state has its own rules about where the case can be filed—and these laws can also dictate which lawyers can pursue the claim.

    While a lawyer from your home state may be able to represent you, he or she may face complications due to:

    • Licensing. Attorneys are granted the ability to practice law on a state-by-state basis. In most cases, lawyers must pass the bar exam in each state in which he or she wishes to practice. For example, an attorney in Oregon may not have a license to practice in Tennessee. If you retain this attorney, he or she may be granted a limited law license to represent a client in the Tennessee court system for one case only. However, this may require the Oregon attorney to work with an in-house counsel—in other words, a local lawyer who can represent the client’s interests. If you may need to work with a Tennessee injury attorney regardless of whether you have a lawyer at home, meeting with one before you leave the state could strengthen your case.
    • Local laws. Even if your at-home attorney has the ability to represent you in a Tennessee court case, it does not mean that he or she is familiar with local and state laws. State statutes and penalties can vary widely depending on where the accident occurs, and a local attorney has a better chance of knowing which laws apply and what complications are likely to arise in your case.
    • Time constraints. Tennessee has an extremely short statute of limitations to bring an injury claim, and victims need to take action quickly to ensure that their cases will be heard. An out-of-state attorney may not have the same familiarity with Tennessee filing deadlines and state judicial requirements as a local lawyer, running the risk that your case will become invalid.

    Our Tennessee injury attorneys fight tenaciously to get the maximum amount of compensation you need to recover—and we do not collect anything from you until after your case is won. Simply fill out the short contact form on this page or request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.

  • Could I recover damages if I suffered a concussion in an accident?

    A concussion may be considered a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), but it can still cause physical and cognitive disturbances that can last for several days. The loss of normal brain function from a concussion is usually temporary, and should resolve on its own with a few days of healing—but in some cases, patients may suffer complications from the injury that have lifelong effects.

    When Patients and Families May Be Owed Compensation for a Concussion

    People with concussions should be monitored carefully to ensure that the concussion is not masking a more serious brain injury. It is normal for patients to have difficulty recalling information, staying focused on one activity, or coping with vision problems during recovery. However, if a patient has difficulty speaking, slowed reflexes, or poor balance and muscle coordination, he or she could have suffered a complication that requires medical intervention.

    Patients may be able to collect compensation if a concussion was the result of a vehicle accident, slip and fall, or medical malpractice and has resulted in:

    • Prolonged symptoms. A patient may be able to sue for damages if a concussion has made it difficult to live and work normally during recovery. Patients may be unable to earn a living due to severe headaches, vision disturbances, dizziness and nausea, light sensitivity, memory loss, concentration problems, and unpredictable mood swings.
    • Brain swelling. A blow to the head may cause symptoms of a concussion, but microscopic damage to the brain cells could result in the swelling of the brain tissue. If the pressure inside the skull is not relieved, the lack of oxygen to the brain may cause brain cell death or even a stroke.
    • Disability or death. While a single concussion does not usually cause permanent damage, it leaves the brain vulnerable to any further trauma. A patient who suffers a second concussion in the days or weeks after the first one may suffer permanent disability or death.

    As the nature of brain injury recovery can be costly and unpredictable, it is important to seek an attorney's advice to get the best continuing care for your loved one. Our Tennessee brain injury attorneys fight tenaciously to get the maximum amount of compensation you need to recover—and we do not collect anything from you until after your case is won. Simply fill out the short contact form on this page or request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.

  • How long will it take to settle my car accident case in Tennessee?

    This is a very common question asked by most victims injured in car accidents in Tennessee. Understandably, most people want to collect their compensation and put the crash behind them as soon as possible. However, it is in your best interest to understand what is involved in a car accident case because it often directly relates to the length of time it takes to resolve it.

    Car wreck settlement compensation

    If you are looking to settle your case quickly, the insurance company will make you an offer at the very beginning of your case. They hope you will accept that offer because it will usually be low, and you might not yet be aware of the extent of your injuries. If you do accept the offer, your case can be resolved within weeks; however, you will no longer be able to collect additional money for your injuries at a later time. This is why it is prudent to be patient and not settle too quickly.

    Factors That Affect the Time to Settle Your Case

    The length of time your case may take to be resolved often depends on the following factors:

    • The extent of your injuries. You never want to settle a car accident injury claim until you recover completely or reach a point of maximum medical improvement. This way, you will know the full extent of your injuries and feel confident that you won’t face additional problems or a future surgery. Although your recovery can take six months or more, which adds time to your case, it is in your best interest to wait until you know the cost of your medical bills, lost wages, and the result of your pain and suffering.
       
    • The cooperation of the insurance company. Some insurance companies are more willing to be flexible than others when it comes to negotiating a settlement. Larger insurance providers have a legal team dedicated to reducing the cost of a claim and negotiating with a plaintiff’s attorney. Smaller insurers may have a large volume of outstanding claims, taking longer for each claim to be addressed by an adjuster. Still, other insurers require several layers of internal review and approval by multiple parties before an amount can be disbursed, especially if the claim is over a certain value. 
       
    • The litigation process. If you decide to pursue a car accident injury lawsuit, there are steps you’ll need to take that will affect the length of time it takes to settle it. After the lawsuit gets filed and the other party gets 30 days to answer, the discovery phase of the case begins. This is the fact-finding process that involves interrogatories (RULE 33.01) where each side gets to ask questions in an effort to collect information from each other about the case. Depositions (statements under oath) will then be taken, and witnesses and medical providers will also be deposed. This process can be lengthy and frustrating but needed in order to strengthen your case. Following this process, the court will typically require mediation. If the case isn’t resolved at this point, a trial date will be set.
       
    • The details of the case. There are many factors involved in an individual case that can add to the timeline of the claim. For example, claims involving government entities may take longer than claims between two drivers and their insurance companies. If there are gaps in the documentation of the crash (such as a missing police report or unavailable witness), the case may take longer to settle. Also, an accident involving a commercial trucking company, delivery truck, or other major corporation may require an extensive investigation, adding to the overall timeline of the case.
       
    • The percentage of fault. It may take some time to clearly establish liability in your case. It is important to be patient throughout this process since liability is a major factor in the amount you may receive in your case. Under Tennessee’s modified comparative negligence system, a claimant’s settlement will be reduced by his percentage of fault for the accident—and if a party is more than 51 percent at fault, he will not be entitled to any damages.

    What to Consider Before Settling Your Case

    A settlement is only one way to conclude your case. If you are not satisfied with the amount you are offered, you may decline the settlement and take your case to trial. While there is the potential for a higher settlement by going to trial, there is also more risk involved. If the insurer makes a strong case to the jury, you may be denied any amount at all for your injuries—and even if you are successful at trial, the defendant has the ability to appeal the decision, forcing you to go through the process all over again. For this reason, many victims would rather accept a settlement that will provide for their losses than go to trial.

    A good settlement in your case will provide payment for:

    • Your out-of-pocket costs. A settlement should at least provide for any costs you have incurred as a direct result of the accident. This includes all of your past medical bills, any medical treatment you may need for your injury in the future, and any property damage that was sustained in the crash. You should also have the total amount of your lost wages from the days of work you missed due to the accident, including any benefits (such as bonuses, commissions, and opportunities for advancement).
       
    • Your future. In many accident cases, the victim will never be able to make a full recovery. You may only be able to work part-time or be unable to earn a sustainable living at all. Nerve damage, paralysis, and other permanent injuries can prevent you from engaging in the activities you formerly enjoyed, effectively changing both your life and your lifestyle. An injury can also make some options impossible for you, such as affecting your ability to have children or to care for the children you already have.
       
    • Your pain and suffering. Pain and suffering is not just an amount for physical discomfort, but for the emotional effects of your injuries. Did the circumstances of your accident cause extreme emotional anguish? Are you seeing a therapist or psychologist on an ongoing basis to deal with the trauma of the accident? Did the accident cause facial disfigurement, loss of quality of life, or place a strain on your relationships with family members? Any one of these effects can be considered in a pain and suffering award.

    Most Tennessee personal injury cases are resolved within nine months to a year and a half. While this may seem like a long time, your compensation may be higher after getting through medical treatment and going through all the proper litigation steps to prove your case.

    Would You Like More Information About Car Accident Cases in Tennessee?

    For help learning more about the car accident injury claim process, request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.

    Free guide to handling car accidents in Tennessee

  • Which doctor should I go to after a car accident?

    Victims should get medical care as soon as possible after a car accident, whether by visiting the emergency room or seeing their regular doctor in the hours after a crash. However, patients will need someone to provide continuing care related to the crash after this initial treatment—and that often means choosing someone other than a primary care doctor to treat crash injuries.

    Choosing the Right Doctor to Treat Your Car Accident Injuries

    Insurance companies will only provide payment if you have proper medical evidence of your injuries. For this reason, you will need an injury doctor who will thoroughly document the cause, treatment, and long-term effects of your injuries in your medical records. The best choice for your ongoing treatment is someone who has experience treating car accident victims and who specializes in your specific type of injury.

    A specialist can be invaluable to your health and your case by:

    • Documenting what happened to you in the accident. A specialist who has treated car accident victims before can give a medical opinion on how your injuries were sustained in the accident (such as a head striking a steering wheel), making it more difficult for insurers to deny the claim.
    • Addressing any pre-existing conditions. Your specialist can identify whether the accident aggravated a previous injury or condition you had suffered in the past, allowing you to claim an additional amount to treat these conditions.
    • Ordering tests, referrals, and specialized treatments. In addition to performing blood tests and ordering imaging studies (such as MRIs or X-rays), specialists may refer you to physical therapists, occupational therapists, and vocational rehabilitation experts who can fully evaluate you to determine the full range of your suffering and losses.
    • Giving a prognosis on future medical care. Although every accident is different, a specialist who routinely treats crash victims has the ability to predict how these injuries will affect patients later in life. Some common complications that may be noted in your medical record include permanent impairment ratings, an estimation of future medical needs, and your ability to work, perform self-care, and enjoy life.

    If you are struggling to recover payment after a car accident, we can take over the fight on your behalf to get you the compensation you are owed. Simply fill out the short contact form on this page or request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.

  • Is it OK to Post Details of My Car Accident on Social Media?

    Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are popular forums for sharing the details of one’s life with friends, family, and strangers. Consequently, it’s not surprising that social media has become an outlet for frustrations—venting to the public can be a satisfying release. However, some things should never be discussed on a public media forum for the simple reason that anyone could see it.

    Car accidents and collision injuries are two such cases where the less said, the better.

    How Social Media Can Wreck Your Claim

    popular social media platform icons

    Handling a car accident claim can be a scary and confusing experience for anyone. However, to protect yourself and secure a strong argument for an injury claim, you must know what to do after a car wreck and you should avoid doing in the aftermath of the collision.

    It is important to realize that insurance companies will exploit every opportunity they can find to deny or lessen an injury claim—this includes details that you give them via public forums. Therefore, an essential rule to follow is to refrain from posting evidence that can be used against you. In other words, do not post any details of your accident on any form of social media, because the defense attorney and insurance company will:

    • Demand access to your account. A defense attorney has the right to access your public accounts to gather evidence that may pertain to his case.
       
    • Gather evidence. Relevant information can include photos (both of the accident as well as any personal photos of you after the accident), timeline posts, conversations between friends, and location check-ins. 
       
    • Use your posts against you. Any information relating to your accident that you have publicly shared can be used to cast doubt on your claim. If you shared a photo of you dancing at a club, the defense could argue that your injuries are obviously not severe. If you posted a Tweet seconds before the collision, the defense might argue that you may have been at-fault for the accident…and so on.

    To ensure that you don’t sabotage or jeopardize your injury claim, be sure to keep all details of your accident off public forums. Keep in mind that once you have posted something, it’s unethical for an attorney to advise you to delete it as that would constitute destruction of evidence. Therefore, before uploading anything or discussing any aspect of your accident publicly, make sure you speak to an attorney first. He will advise you on what you can and cannot post.

    For more information on pursuing a car accident injury claim, contact our office today at 615-807-7900 or get your our FREE guide for personal injury cases in Tennessee. We are eager to help you build a strong case. Call today to see how we can help.

  • Will my settlement cover the costs of a permanent brain injury?

    Lawsuits involving traumatic brain injuries are often complicated because no two brain injuries are the same. Even after a victim’s condition has stabilized, the long-term conditions he or she may suffer can vary widely, and doctors may not be able to predict when (or if) these effects will improve. For this reason, it is vital that victims consult with a brain injury attorney to calculate their potential future expenses and costs of care before accepting a settlement.

    Estimating the Long-Term Costs of a Brain Injury

    The losses suffered by brain injury victims go far beyond the costs of medical care. Although patients typically require ongoing doctor’s appointments, rehabilitation, and therapy, they also lose control over their lives and are forced to forgo opportunities available to others. All of these losses should be considered carefully when negotiating compensation during a personal injury lawsuit.

    Brain injury victims should receive enough compensation to pay for the full range of losses their injury has caused, including:

    • Partial disability. Physical disabilities after a brain injury can range from vision and hearing problems to an inability to use the arms or legs. Many people are unable to earn a living after a head injury, and those who can work may not be able to return to the same job or type of work they did before the injury. Physical disabilities can also prevent victims from participating in activities they once enjoyed, such as traveling, exercising, or playing sports.
    • Cognitive impairment. Brain injuries can cause memory impairment, difficulty concentrating, sudden confusion, slowed cognitive responses, or attention deficits that affect earning capacity as well as the ability to engage in pastimes or hobbies.
    • Behavioral and emotional changes. Brain injuries can cause changes in a person’s behavior, while emotional suffering may result from the trauma of coping with life changes caused by the injury. Victims may experience mood swings, fatigue, sudden bursts of anger, or lost impulse control, which can significantly affect their relationships and quality of life.
    • Inability to perform self-care. A severe brain injury may require in-home nursing care, breathing assistance, or hospice care, further impacting the resources of the victim’s family.

    Severe brain injuries can affect every aspect of a victim’s life, and it will take experience and tenacity to ensure that victims are adequately compensated for their pain and suffering. Our Tennessee injury attorneys fight to get you the maximum amount of compensation you need to recover—and we do not collect anything from you until after your case is won. Simply fill out the short contact form on this page or request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.

  • Is it true that I cannot sue the driver of a municipal vehicle in Tennessee?

    While municipal vehicles such as ambulances, police cars, garbage trucks, and school buses are just as likely to be involved in an accident as passenger cars, state laws make cases against the at-fault driver more complex. Tennessee laws prevent car accident victims from suing individual drivers who are employed by state or city governments. However, the victim can bring a claim against the governing body to cover medical bills and other losses sustained in the crash.

    Filing a Crash Lawsuit Against a City or County Government in Tennessee

    Drivers of city, county, and state vehicles are protected under the Tennessee Governmental Tort Liability Act (GTLA). The Act allows the governmental entity to be held liable instead of its negligent driver, as long as the driver was an employee of the city or county and was acting in the course and scope of employment at the time of the crash.

    Unfortunately, the GTLA places a number of restrictions on these cases, including:

    • Per victim recovery limits. The law limits the amount of compensation for bodily injury or death of any one person in an accident at $300,000.
    • Per accident recovery limits. The Act places a total per accident cap of $700,000 for city and county defendants, and a cap of $1,000,000 for accidents caused by state employees.
    • Loss of punitive damages. Since the amount that can be recovered in these accidents is limited by law, any amount awarded for punitive damages do not have to be paid (unless the government entity has an insurance policy in place that could cover the additional amount). 
    • Statute of limitations. Most claims against governments must be brought within one year of the date of injury.
    • Loss of jury trial. Most of these cases are decided by a judge rather than a trial by jury.

    If you were struck by a municipal vehicle, you should speak to an attorney as soon as possible. Among other things, we can determine whether the driver was a government employee or an outsourced driver—a difference that can have a major impact on your case. Simply fill out the short contact form on this page or request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.

  • Who pays for my medical treatment after a pedestrian accident?

    After you have been struck by a car while walking or cycling, you are unfortunately at the beginning of a long and arduous journey. The injuries sustained in these kinds of accidents may be extensive, and healthcare providers are going to want payment for your medical bills as quickly as possible. While you may win compensation for your medical bills and other damages in an injury lawsuit, it can take months before the matter is resolved—what should you do in the meantime?

    Ways to Pay Medical Bills After a Pedestrian Accident

    Tennessee subscribes to the “fault” system for car accident injuries, so the person who caused the accident is legally liable for paying for your medical bills and other losses related to the crash. This means you will file an insurance claim with the at-fault driver’s insurance company, and the insurance company should pay the hospital bill. However, this does not always go smoothly.

    One of the biggest problems pedestrians encounter is that their injuries can cost tens of thousands of dollars, and may exceed the limit of insurance purchased by the driver.  If the injury costs more than the maximum coverage limit, the victim will have to collect additional coverage through other sources.

    Victims can seek additional payment for their injuries through:

    • Their own health insurance. It is important that you see a doctor right away, both for your health and for the success of your injury claim. Don’t be afraid to pay bills using your own health insurance. These costs can always be recouped later when your claim is settled.
    • Their own auto insurance. Tennessee law requires injury victims to exhaust the other driver’s car insurance coverage before collecting under their own. There is an exception for hit-and-run accidents, since the victim will likely be unable to make a claim with the at-fault driver if he or she is never located. If your car insurance policy includes uninsured motorist coverage, it may be used to cover your expenses for injuries even though you were not driving at the time of the accident.
    • MedPay. Medical Payments coverage, or MedPay, is an optional form of insurance that is offered in addition to your own car insurance. It is up to each policyholder whether he or she will purchase MedPay, as well as the amount that will be provided after an accident. However, you must have it in advance of a collision in order to collect.
    • Medicaid. If you don’t have health insurance and you do not own a car, you may qualify for medical coverage through Medicaid. This federal health insurance program that provides medical coverage to patients without employer-sponsored or private health insurance. If you qualify, Medicaid will pay your medical bills going forward, and could be used to pay some of your past bills. You can check the requirements and apply for coverage through Tennessee’s Medicaid program.
    • A third party. There could be someone else whose negligence played a part in your accident. If you were struck by a drunk driver, you could have a case against the restaurant that over-served alcohol to the driver. If the car that struck you malfunctioned due to bad brakes or a stuck accelerator pedal, the auto manufacturer could be held liable. An attorney can investigate the accident on your behalf and tell you who can be named in your injury lawsuit.

    A pedestrian accident is painful and debilitating enough without adding the financial consequences of the accident onto the victim. Our injury attorneys will fight to get you the maximum amount of compensation you deserve after a crash, and we do not collect anything from you until after your case is won. Simply fill out the short contact form on this page or request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.

  • What are the most common causes of injuries on airplanes?

    airplane aisle and flight attendant with cartAviation accidents can occur at any point between takeoff and landing, and not all injuries are the result of a crash. Even if the plane makes it from point A to point B safely, passengers and crew members can suffer a variety of painful and even life-altering injuries that can cause suffering for decades after the incident.

    Common In-Flight Injuries Suffered on Airplanes

    In-flight accidents are common on commercial airlines, but they also frequently occur on small aircrafts such as corporate jets, charter flights, or helicopters. Aviation laws give injury victims the right to file lawsuits against the airline, its employees, or even the manufacturer of a defective component of the aircraft for the effects of a serious injury.

    The most common causes of aviation injuries during a flight include:

    • Turbulence. Turbulence plays a role in the majority of injuries sustained while an aircraft is in flight. Even small changes in altitude can cause the plane to shake or drop suddenly, and the unpredictable nature of turbulence can lead to passengers hitting their heads against windows, tripping or falling on the way to the restroom, or even being thrown from their seats into the hard surfaces of the cabin. Turbulence injuries may range from scrapes or bruises to twisted ankles and broken bones.
    • Luggage. Luggage falling from overhead baggage compartments causes thousands of injuries every year, a number of which may increase as airlines continue to charge for each piece of checked luggage. Overhead baggage compartments may suddenly spring open during flight as a result of turbulence, faulty latches, a cabin crew’s failure to store items safely, or merely as a result of overloading the compartment. Passengers seated underneath the compartment door may suffer broken noses, facial lacerations, or collarbone injuries when struck by carry-on items, while those struck by heavy luggage may suffer concussions or skull fractures that lead to traumatic brain injuries. A severe blow to the head may require extensive treatment, cause memory loss and irreversible personality changes, and prevent the victim from returning to his or her normal life.
    • Adverse medical events. If a passenger or crew member suffers a heart attack, stroke, or other medical emergency during a flight, the pilot should make every effort to provide lifesaving treatment—including landing the plane before the final destination. The pilot should communicate any in-flight medical emergencies to ground staff—and if the crew does not have adequate equipment or medical staff on board, the pilot should be able to divert the plane. Airlines may be held liable for the mishandling of a medical emergency even if the airline did not cause the original event.
    • Food service. Food services may be necessary on long flights, but they can also carry injury risks. A food or drink cart that has not been properly secured may roll forward, striking the arms or legs of passengers who are seated on the aisle. Spoiled or uncooked meals may cause passengers to suffer food poisoning, while the presence of nuts or other allergens can lead to adverse reactions and anaphylactic shock. Finally, a failure to provide food in a timely manner can cause passengers with diabetes to experience low blood sugar or insulin shock, leading to a diabetic coma.

    Commercial airlines may not be able to guarantee the safety of their passengers, but they do have a heightened duty of care while transporting passengers. A commercial carrier can be held responsible for any injuries caused by the negligence of its employees and pilots, or if its standard operating procedures unnecessarily place passengers at risk.

    If you were injured while traveling by plane, we can conduct a thorough investigation to determine who is responsible for your suffering—and we do not collect any legal fees unless we secure you the compensation you deserve. Simply fill out the short contact form on this page to set up your no-cost injury consultation, or learn more about your rights in our free guide, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.