Will my settlement cover the costs of a permanent brain injury?

Lawsuits involving traumatic brain injuries are often complicated because no two brain injuries are the same. Even after a victim’s condition has stabilized, the long-term conditions he or she may suffer can vary widely, and doctors may not be able to predict when (or if) these effects will improve. For this reason, it is vital that victims consult with a brain injury attorney to calculate their potential future expenses and costs of care before accepting a settlement.

Estimating the Long-Term Costs of a Brain Injury

The losses suffered by brain injury victims go far beyond the costs of medical care. Although patients typically require ongoing doctor’s appointments, rehabilitation, and therapy, they also lose control over their lives and are forced to forgo opportunities available to others. All of these losses should be considered carefully when negotiating compensation during a personal injury lawsuit.

Brain injury victims should receive enough compensation to pay for the full range of losses their injury has caused, including:

  • Partial disability. Physical disabilities after a brain injury can range from vision and hearing problems to an inability to use the arms or legs. Many people are unable to earn a living after a head injury, and those who can work may not be able to return to the same job or type of work they did before the injury. Physical disabilities can also prevent victims from participating in activities they once enjoyed, such as traveling, exercising, or playing sports.
  • Cognitive impairment. Brain injuries can cause memory impairment, difficulty concentrating, sudden confusion, slowed cognitive responses, or attention deficits that affect earning capacity as well as the ability to engage in pastimes or hobbies.
  • Behavioral and emotional changes. Brain injuries can cause changes in a person’s behavior, while emotional suffering may result from the trauma of coping with life changes caused by the injury. Victims may experience mood swings, fatigue, sudden bursts of anger, or lost impulse control, which can significantly affect their relationships and quality of life.
  • Inability to perform self-care. A severe brain injury may require in-home nursing care, breathing assistance, or hospice care, further impacting the resources of the victim’s family.

Severe brain injuries can affect every aspect of a victim’s life, and it will take experience and tenacity to ensure that victims are adequately compensated for their pain and suffering. Our Tennessee injury attorneys fight to get you the maximum amount of compensation you need to recover—and we do not collect anything from you until after your case is won. Simply fill out the short contact form on this page or request a free copy of our book, The 10 Worst Mistakes You Can Make With Your Tennessee Injury Case.